Missed Shots

Rules questions, suggestions, and discussion

Moderators: Pwnerade, IVhorseman

Do you think this is realistik?

Yes!
4
40%
I guess...
3
30%
Eh, I don't care either way.
1
10%
No!
0
No votes
What's a mocassin?
2
20%
 
Total votes : 10

Missed Shots

Postby Blitzen » Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:10 pm

I was in a battle with my brother. I had a castle with a catapult, and he had two giant trebuchets. We each had about 50 minifigs. Now, I wasn't very happy with the missed shot rules, which are as follows:
Da Rulez wrote:When an attacker misses a shot, and he or another player insists on tracking it, check to see how many points the Attack Roll missed by. (For instance, if the attacker rolled a 3 when he needed a 5, then the Attack Roll missed by 2.) The Missed Shot landed somewhere within this many inches of the target. The defending player may pick any spot within that range that he wishes. That's where the shot goes, provided that it's somewhere the weapon could theoretically have hit in the first place, no matter how ridiculous or unlikely. The weapon's Damage is then dished out as appropriate.

While it inbeds tons of carnage into fig-based combat, I don't think it works for heavy lourde machinery. This would mean that a lobbed big, giant rock could pinpoint a guy that was 40" away. And if we didn't track it, the rock would just disappear off the face of the earth. Yes, 40". Sometimes it was even 52". Of course, I don't even think the trebuchet's rules were right. I'm pretty sure we weren't even playing BrikWars.

Here is the situation:
My brother has two trebuchets at 8" each. It takes one turn for his swarm of figs to put a rock in, so if he alternated each turn, he can get one rock off every turn. These are the stats for the trebuchets:

<B>Trebuchet</B> x 2
Cost: 1/3 of a castle (he had two of these and a siege tower; I had a castle)
Use: 24 (size times 3)
Range: 8d6" (size d6)
Damage: breaking things (a giant rock)
Notes: Up to 8 minifigs can work together to fire this thing. (size)

What we did was:
0.5. He choses the angle of attack. There is no need for a real angle; just a point in the right direction will do.
1. He rolls the skill to use it. If he wins, follow this list. If not, go to the other.
2a. He rolls the range.
3a. The rock goes that range at that angle, and when it hits, approximately 13.827 brix were torn out and scattered about.

If he missed the initial skill roll:
2b. He rolls the range.
3b. The rock flies that range, at that angle, but there's a <I>twist</I>.
4b. You need the amount he missed by and an analog clock-like mechanism. See how the clock goes from 1 to 12, or I to XII? Divide the even numbers on the clock by so that they go from 1 to 6, or I to VI. Roll a die and correspond that angle to where the number is on the clock. Now, the rock goes at that angle, the number of skill you missed by away. If you have a d12 handy, this could be done without modifying the clock, and if you have no imagination you can look at this handy diagram made in MS Paint.

Diagram:
<img src="http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f371/Fracraito/clockdice.jpg">

<B>EXAMPLE</B>

The Crew wants to attack the Castle with their size 6 Catapult. They choose an angle of attack and roll their skill. There can be a maximum of six people working this catapult, but the Crew only has five. Their skill roll comes to a total of 14, short of the 18 UR. They miss by 4. Following this, they roll a the range on 6d6. The result, with a Critical Success, is 28". Since the skill roll was off, the Crew rolls a d6 to determine the angle and get a 3 -- straight backwards. This rock flies 28" in the direction they chose, and then 4" back towards the catapult.


Tell me why you didn't like it.
Image
Often, literally, a pillow fight but may include similar situations like volleyball, particularly when wardrobe is skimpy and the action is bouncy.
User avatar
Blitzen
Distinguished Owner of the English Language
 
Posts: 1897
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 5:17 pm
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Postby Bonn-o-Tron » Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:26 pm

I've never had colossal siege weapons in any of my battles, so I've never bothered to think up stats for situations such as this, although it does seem to work. One idea I've had for Catapults before is that you determine a 'landing radius' for the projectile, based off that size. Where ever it lands, it damages (or horribly disfigures) the units within that radius.
Image
:rei: :rei: :rei: :rei: :rei: :rei: :rei:
User avatar
Bonn-o-Tron
Playmobil
 
Posts: 1684
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 11:58 pm
Location: Brodmann area 17

Postby IVhorseman » Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:34 pm

a stumble die is a great way to calculate random directions. this is just a d6 with arrows slapped on it. it also gives a number, in case you want to use that for "this many inches away".

traditional tabletop games also have used a d8 (if available) for directions. faces 1-8 correspond to N, NW, W, SW, S... etc.

however the most fun, easy, brikwarsian method of calculating where missed siege shots land that i've personally found the best is actually only a day old. check the artillery rules thread for full details, but rayhawk himself said that you could calculate where bombs/huge rocks fall as a function of literally dropping brix onto the target, as follows:

1. hold a brik 4x(missed by) inches above intended target.

2. drop brik

3. where the brik lands after bounces etc., this is where the shot lands. any pieces or figs knocked over by the bouncing brik are considered to have been knocked down by the blast.

hey, it works good for me.
User avatar
IVhorseman
If she don't want the brick, she won't get the dick
 
Posts: 6377
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:12 pm
Location: The Abyss


Return to The Rulebook

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests