Birdman's SuperMarines! Game

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Birdman's SuperMarines! Game

Postby birdman » Sat Aug 08, 2009 1:23 pm

This is a dinky little ruleset I've been playing around with that deals with randomly spawning enemies and valiant last stands. I think it's pretty much finalized, so I figured I'd turn it over to my buddies at brikwars to mangle, er, have fun with.

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SuperMarines!
A Heroes System Game.
(c) 2009 The Birdman (Joe Byrd)

A squad of SuperMarines! is trapped far beyond enemy lines, in the claws of the Slaughter Sector Empire! In this game, players attempt to cause the horrible demise of the SuperMarines! or attempt to take down as many SS goons as possible before death.

Player 1: SuperMarines!
Objective: Hold off the encroaching SS forces for 2d20 turns, while rescue is en route.

Player 2: Slaughter Sector!
Objective: Kill all the SuperMarines! before rescue arrives.

This game requires a large quantity of identical miniatures. If no such supply is available, playing with cardboard cutouts or with graph paper is recommended.

In SuperMarines! one inch is equal to six feet. One turn is equal to ten seconds.

To play SuperMarines!, you need a copy of these rules, about five six-sided dice, one ten-sided die, and one twenty-sided die. These oddly-numbered dice can be found at your local game store. Paper and pencil to take down notes on the condition of vehicles as well as the hit points of troops is also necessary. Finally, you will need a collection of 25 millimeter miniatures.

When the rules instruct you to roll dice, they will refer to dice as a number preceding the letter ‘d’ followed by another number. To decipher this, note the following: the first number refers to the number of dice to roll, e.g., 5d6 is 5 dice. The letter ‘d’ refers to the fact that you are rolling dice, which is abbreviated to ‘d’. The final number is the number of sides on the die, so 5d6 says ‘roll 5 six-sided dice’. Operations are also possible using this notation, coming out to something resembling ‘1d6+1’, which means, ‘roll 1 six-sided die and add 1 to the result’.

When the rules talk about a ‘force’ or an ‘army’, they are referring to the entire amount of miniatures a player has on the table.

When the rules talk about a ‘model’, a ‘trooper’ or a ‘miniature’, they are referring to a single miniature fig-ure on the battlefield.

When the rules talk about a ‘squad’ or a ‘unit’, or occasionally a 'batch', they are referring to a group of similar figures which operate to-gether on the battlefield. SuperMarines do not operate in squads and each SuperMarine! model may move independently. SS troops are in squads based on what they are spawned with, and must remain within 2" of one other member of the same squad that they spawned with at all times. If they ever are separated or are more than 2" from their squad, they may only move until they are back within 2".

This game has 2 golden rules in it. These rules take precedence over any other rules in this book, and if anybody makes a supplement to this book, these two rules take precedence over those rules as well.
1.Round to the nearest whole number when dealing with fractions or decimals. If it’s a .5, round down.
2.When a die is rolled and the highest amount that can be rolled is rolled (i.e., a 20 on a d20, a 6 on a d6), roll another die of the same type as the first one and add the result of that die roll to the first. If you get another high amount, keep rolling until you stop getting such lucky rolls.
Follow these rules and you’ll be all set!

When you sit down to play a game of SuperMarines! it helps to know what your troops can do and what they can’t. Each trooper in your force has a set of 5 statistics or characteristics that govern how good they are at doing various battlefield actions. They are described in more detail below. The name of the stat below is anteceded by its abbreviation. Stats will be referred to throughout the rules either by their name or their abbreviation.

DEFENCE (DEF)
This is a measure of your model’s ability to avoid harm. SuperMarines have a DEF of 8.
HIT POINTS (HP)
This is a measure of your model’s ability to take damage. Most models have 1 HP, but rarer models will have 2 or more. If you ever run out of HP, your model is dead! Slaughter Sector troopers have 1 HP.
EXPERTISE (EXP)
A model’s expertise gives it a number of re-rolls (usable on any die roll) that represent the model’s training. When the reroll is used (once per turn, on only one ac-tion per point of expertise), the number rolled must be accepted by the player, even if it is a worse result than previously rolled. Models with 2 or more expertise can reroll a previous re-roll to correct a poor roll. Fragger Super Elites have 1 EXP.
MOVEMENT (MVT)
Even good troops can only move as fast as their legs will carry them, or sometimes how fast their vehicle can go. Movement is a measure of how far a trooper or vehicle can go under its own power. Combat Drones have 12" MVT.
FIRE POINTS (FP)
Fire points determine how much stuff your model can carry, like guns, swords, or cannons. Slaughterbots have 4 FP.

Weapons have a few more stats than these given above, but these are explained in the appropriate sections.

In a game of SuperMarines, the game turn follows a significantly different pattern than in most other wargames. Basical-ly,

In the game the SuperMarine! player always goes first. His turn looks like:
1. Movement
2. Shooting
3. Close Combat

The Slaughter Sector always goes second. His turn looks like:
1. Roll Reinforcements
2. Movement
3. Shooting
4. Close Combat

When rolling reinforcements, the SS player makes 1 roll on the table below, to determine what troops reinforce the existing SS troops on the field. The roll is 1d6.

1-2: No reinforcements.
3: Batch of 1d6 Basic-level troops.
4: Batch of 1d6 Special-level troops.
5: Batch of 2d6 Basic-level troops plus 1d3 Special-level troops.
6: Batch of 1d6 Heavy-level troops.

When reinforcements are rolled, they are scattered (using a scatter die or other direction randomizer) 4d6+10" away from the largest group of SuperMarines! on the field.

The different phases (i.e., the movement phase, the shooting phase, and the CAC phase) are discussed in their particular chapters.

THE MOVEMENT PHASE

The first thing you should do during the movement phase is determine which troops you want to move. This may be all, some or none of your total force. The reasons for not moving some troops vary. Maybe you want to fire a heavy weapon with them, or they are engaged in CAC. Then, move the troops you wanted to move up to their maximum movement allowance. This will usually be around five inches, or converting into the ground scale, about 30 feet.

A squad can declare that it wants to go to ground if they have not moved and there are no enemy models within 12 inches. To go to ground the squad must pass a Morale check. If the check is passed the squad has gone to ground successfully (place a gone to ground marker of some kind next to the squad). If the check is failed then the squad makes an error while going to ground, or chooses an incorrect hiding spot. If this happens, the squad can do nothing else during the movement phase. SuperMarines make this roll on a per-model basis.

A squad that has gone to ground acts as though they are in one higher level of cover than they are actually in. So, a squad that has gone to ground on a featureless plain is in minimal cover, if it’s in a wheat field, it’s in soft cover, if it’s behind a ditch, it’s are in medium cover, if it’s in a forest, it’s in hard cover, and if it’s in a trench it’s in heavy cover. If they happen to be in heavy cover when they go to ground, they gain +1 to DEF. As soon as the squad moves it no longer counts as going to ground.

Bulky Models: Some models are so huge and bulky that going to ground gives those no additional benefit, to represent this, models that have 7 DEF or better cannot go to ground.

A squad can attempt to run that little bit further that’s necessary to get into cover or to get to another loca-tion. When a squad runs, they may not fire any weapons, unless they get involved in close combat. The running squad gets an extra D6 inches to their movement for the phase.

Models that wear heavier or bulkier armor may find it hard to run, to represent this models with DEF 7 or better cannot run at all, while models with DEF 5 or 6 suffer a –1 to the D6 result for running, down to a mini-mum of 1.

SuperMarines! make this roll on a model-by-model basis.

Sometimes, your troops will want to move through stuff that is difficult to get through. This can be stuff like forests, piles of boulders, or heaps of dead bodies. Use your common sense: if it looks like it’s going to be difficult to get through, it’s probably difficult terrain. Before you start the game, agree with your opponent(s) what terrain is what kind of difficult terrain. There are three kinds of difficult terrain. Slightly difficult terrain reduces a model’s movement by a quarter. Difficult terrain reduces a model’s movement by half, and very difficult terrain reduces a squad’s movement by three-quarters. There is also a special brand of terrain, impassable terrain. Impassable terrain cannot be moved through by foot squads, although it can be flown over. SuperMarines check difficult terrain on a per-model basis.

THE SHOOTING PHASE

The first thing to do in the shooting phase is to deter-mine LOS. LOS stands for Line of Sight, which is an im-aginary line that is unimpeded by any obstacle and is drawn between one model to another. Any model that is in the line of sight of another model can be seen by that model, and vice versa. If you can see him, he can see you. You cannot make attacks on something without having a valid LOS to them, and neither is it possible to shoot someone while remaining unseen. Note that models in CAC are automatically assumed to have LOS to all squads touching their bases.
An enemy squad does block LOS to a target beyond it.

Note that some kinds of cover might appear to block LOS but don’t really. If a patch of the model appears, no matter how small it is, the shooter has LOS to it. Note that the model does not include weapons or other ac-cessories. A part of the model’s actual body must be visible to be in LOS.

A squad or model can aim their shots if they have not moved in the movement phase.
Models which aim gain the ability to reroll any missed to-hit rolls in their shooting phase.

To shoot, first determine the range factor (RF) of the distance to the target. RF is 1 for every 10” to the target. Ranges of less than 10” give an RF of ½ (that’s total, not per inch). Then, multiply the RF by the range multiplier of the weapon to get the base target number (BTN). Then add the target’s DEF and any modifiers from cover (as listed below) to the BTN to get the final target number (FTN). Roll an amount of d6 equal to the weapon’s ATK value for a result higher than the FTN to score a hit. For every 3 points (or fraction thereof) higher than the FTN, the target takes 1 HP worth of damage. A target that has no HP is dead!

Note that it is unimportant what the actual range to the target is – only the modifier of the weapon matters. No matter how far the range is there is always a slight chance that the target could get hit. However, at ridi-culous ranges it starts to get very difficult, so unless there is a very pressing reason to be shooting at such ranges, it is advised to not shoot until the units get closer to each other, to avoid slowing down the game.

Cover modifiers:
Minimal cover: +1
Light cover: +2
Medium cover: +3
Heavy cover: +4
Hard cover: +5

A model only counts as being in cover if it is within 3” of the cover. If it is beyond 3”, it is not in cover. If a shoot-ing model is within 3” of a piece of cover that contains the model’s target, the model may ignore that cover.

Any squad that takes three or more hits (just hits, not kills) from shooting is pinned down, and cannot move until it makes a successful Morale check. SuperMarines! ignore this rule.

When picking targets to shoot at, remember that every model in the targeted squad must be hit once before a model can be hit a second time. For example, if a SuperMarine with a minigun shoots at a 3-strong squad, since there are 5 shots to be distributed, 3 models get one shot, and another two of those models get an extra shot.

No matter how many weapons a model has, it can only fire them at 1 target per turn, unless they're automatic.

CLOSE ASSAULT COMBAT

Close Assault Combat, whose acronym CAC is pro-nounced like ‘Cack’, is probably the most fun part of SuperMarines! During CAC, two squads duke it out mano a mano in a single moment of great import.

To get into CAC, models from the squad whose turn it is must make a charge move. To do that, simply move the models as far as their movement allowance would take them if they were to move again. At the end of that charge, their bases must be in contact with at least one of the enemy models. If they are not, they must go back to their original positions and cannot charge again.

During the charge move, you should move as many models in the charging squad as possible into base con-tact with enemy models. Note that this may mean that if one squad charges a squad that is standing very close to another enemy squad, some models in the charging squad may not be able to reach the enemy squad that most of their squad charged but may be able to charge the other enemy squad.

Charging is the only way to get into close combat with an enemy. If for some reason a model gets into base contact with an enemy without charging, it is moved so that the bases do not make contact and the models are not in close combat.

Attacking in CAC is vaguely similar to shooting. Models may only attack models that are in base contact with them, and vice versa. To CAC, roll the ATK of the weapon used plus the attackers DEF minus the target’s roll of ATK of his weapon used plus his DEF. The model with the highest roll has hit its opponent. For every 3 points (or fraction thereof) that the roll beat the opponent’s roll, 1 HP worth of damage is inflicted to the hit model. When a model runs out of HP, it is dead. Models with no CC weapon instead use 1d6 as the damage of their weapon.

At the end of a particular turn’s worth of fighting in CAC, total up the numbers of casualties caused to each side. The side that inflicted the most wins and the loser(s) must take a morale check or fall back 2d6” from the winner. In the event of a tie, the units that are tied re-main locked in CAC until someone wins in a later turn. SuperMarines cannot lose in CAC because they are single models and either die or win the CAC.

WEAPONS

Weapons are simple and have a set of statistics that allow them to be fired by anyone or anything issued one.

There are several kinds of weapons, but they fall down into two broad classes: ranged weapons and CAC wea-pons.
Let’s take a look at a typical ranged weapon: the assault rifle.

NAME: Assault Rifle
MULT: X1
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 1
FP: 2
Class: B(asic)
Cost: 1

As shown in the table above, assault rifles have an At-tack of 1d6, the significance of which is explained in the section entitled ‘Shooting Phase. It has an ROF (Rate of Fire) of 1, allowing it to fire once in the shooting phase. It costs 1 point to buy an assault rifle for a model. The heading titled ‘FP’ stands for ‘Fire Points’ and it governs how much equipment a model can carry. When equip-ping models with weapons, each point of FP a weapon has uses up a point of FP that its owner has. When a model is out of FP, it can’t carry any other weapons.

If a model carrying a heavy (H) weapon moved before it fired the weapon, it takes a -1 penalty to its roll in com-bat.

A close combat weapon is just a gun with no range and no ROF.

Every weapon may be equipped with a bayonet that gives it a 1d6+1 Attack weapon in close combat.

In addition to the different weapon types, there are also three effects that can be added on to the fire of a weapon. The first is a fingercone. To make a fingercone, splay your middle and your index fingers apart, folding the rest of your hand into a fist. Any range additional to the fingercone will be measured straight outwards from the tips of your fingers. Anything within this cone is tar-geted by the weapon, and requires a to-hit roll.

The next is a small blast. To make a small blast, make a circle out of your fingers leaving a hole in the middle, by touching the tip of your index finger to the thumb on the same hand. Place your hand, formed into the small blast, at the end of the weapon’s range. Any model whose base is touched by your hand, or is within the hole, is targeted by the weapon, and requires a to-hit roll.

Lastly, there is the large blast. To make a large blast, place your hand on the table. Radiate your fingers as far outwards as they can go. Place the large blast at the end of the weapon’s range. Any model under your hand (treat the gaps between the fingers as part of your hand) is targeted and requires a to-hit roll.

It is also possible to ‘relaxed-fit’ a weapon. This reduces both the FP of the weapon in question by -1, making the aforementioned assault rifle able to be used one-handed, while taking a -1 penalty to to-hit rolls with the rifle.

PLAYING A GAME (in steps)

1. Roll 2d6+2 for the number of SuperMarines! on the field. Place them in the center of the field.
2. Add 1 SuperMarine! Commander to their number.
3. Roll 2d20 for the number of turns for the game to last.
4. Make 1 reinforcement roll to start the SS Player with some troops on the board.
5. SuperMarines get first turn.
6. Play proceeds until 2d20 turns are up or all SuperMarines are dead.

If for some reason it is dark out when the battle is fought (i.e., it is night, or the sun sets) all shooting takes a -1 penalty to hit. Troops may spend an extra two points per model to negate this penalty (by acquiring night vision goggles or the like). Vehicles are assumed to be equipped with targeting arrays that allow normal firing.

You should go over with your opponent what is minim-al, light, medium, heavy and hard cover. Something like a chain-link fence or a cornfield is minimal cover. Light cover is something like a hedge or a ditch. Medium cover is a little forest or a wooden shack. Heavy cover is something like a rock wall or trench. Finally, hard cover is something like a jungle or a building. Terrain can really be anything, from buildings or trenches to lakes and cliffs. No single piece of terrain may be larger than 2’ square, or, in the case of rivers, over 5” wide and 5’ long.

MORALE

Morale checks are an important part of the SuperMarines! game. You cannot always depend upon your troops to fearlessly go wherever you tell them. Morale checks add that factor of unpredictability to your troops.

A squad must take a Morale check on three occasions: being the loser in close combat, suffering at least 2 ca-sualties (that’s ‘in one turn’ not ‘total’) in shooting, or when other rules tell you to.

Squads possess a morale level equal to the number of models in them: squads with 1-6 models have morale level 1, squads with 7-12 models have morale level 2, and squads with 13-18 models have morale level 3. To make a morale check, roll as many dice as the squad’s morale level and attempt to get above the squad’s panic level. To derive the panic level of a squad, total the number of casualties taken by the squad. If the roll is equal to or less than the squad’s panic level, they will fall back 2D6 inches in a straight line back towards the nearest table edge, unless the rules tell you that they would fall back more or less. If the squad would fall back beyond the table edge, it may attempt to rally one last time, if it fails it will fall back again and be removed from the game. Note that this result occurs with any models which move off the edge of the table, whether moving there under their own power or falling back.
At the end of each turn, all troops which would be fall-ing back may take a Morale check to see if they rally. If they fail, they will continue falling back in their next turn. If any model falls back into an enemy model behind it, the falling back model is removed.

Disorder occurs when a squad has been disorganized by one or more events, and as a result its overall fighting ability has been reduced.
A squad is considered disordered in the following cir-cumstances:

When under attack by flying enemies (if not able to fly themselves), or When involved in the second consecutive round of one single close combat with the same foe.
When falling back for whatever reason.
When crossing a terrain obstacle that slows movement by at least half.
If attacked in the flank or rear.
When fighting a squad in, or moving through fog.
Disordered models take a -1 penalty to morale checks.

SuperMarines! are immune to all morale effects and automatically succeed at all morale checks they are required to make.

FORCES

SuperMarines!

Main Weapon Table (d20)
1: Assault Rifle
2: Minigun
3: Grenade Launcher
4: Flamer
5: Autocannon
6: Rocket Launcher
7: Shotgun
8: Sniper Rifle
9: Ion Cannon
10: Auto-Shotgun
11: Boltgun
12: Dual-Wielded Pistols
13: Tesla Rifle
14: Laser Rifle
15: Pulse Rifle
16: Laser-Guided SMG
17: Fragmentation Projector
18-20: Pick one

Slaughter Sector Main Weapon Table (d6)
1-2: Pulse Rifle
3-4: Laser-Guided SMG
5-6: Fragmentation Projector

Grenade Table (d6)
1: Frag Grenade
2: HE Grenade
3: Incendiary Grenade
4: Flash Grenade
5-6: Pick one

SuperMarine! Trooper
DEF: 8
HP: 4
EXP: 0
MVT: 5
FP: 2
The SuperMarine player starts with 2d6+2 SuperMarine! Troopers.

SuperMarine! Commander
DEF: 8
HP: 4
EXP: 2
MVT: 6
FP: 2
The SuperMarine player starts with 1 SuperMarine commander.

Each SuperMarine (including commanders) has 1 roll on the main weapon table and 1 roll on the grenade table.

Slaughter Sector

Reinforcement Charts: When a result is rolled on the reinforcement table that indicates either Basic, Special, or Heavy troops to deploy, roll on the following tables for the specific troop type. The rolled result applies to the whole batch.

Basic Troop Table (d4)
1: Combat Drone
2: SS Trooper
3: Light Combat Suit
4: Autonomous Weapon Platform

Special Troop Table (d3)
1: Medium Combat Suit
2: Fragger Super Elite
3: SS Marine

Heavy Troop Table (d2)
1: Heavy Combat Suit
2: SlaughterBot

Combat Drone
DEF: 3
HP: 1
EXP: 0
MVT: 12
FP: 2
Aerial
This model can fly. It ignores difficult and impeding terrain but counts cover as 1 less than it actually would be. Gets 1 roll on the SS main weapon table.

SS Trooper
DEF: 4
HP: 1
EXP: 0
MVT: 5
FP: 2
Gets 1 roll on the SS main weapon table and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

Light Combat Suit
DEF: 5
HP: 1
EXP: 0
MVT: 6
FP: 2
Gets 1 roll on the SS main weapon table and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

Autonomous Weapon Platform
DEF: 3
HP: 2
EXP: 0
MVT: 4
FP: 4
Gets 2 rolls on the SS main weapon table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

Medium Combat Suit
DEF: 6
HP: 2
EXP: 0
MVT: 5
FP: 2
Advanced Armor
Ignores the effects of HE or AP weapons.
Gets 1 roll on the SS main weapon table and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

Fragger Super Elite
DEF: 5
HP: 2
EXP: 1
MVT: 5
FP: 2
Role Model
Every SS trooper dreams of become a FSE someday. FSE's inspire other non-FSE troops within 5" to have +1 to attack rolls. This bonus is noncumulative.
Gets 1 roll on the SS main weapon table and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

SS Marine
DEF: 5
HP: 2
EXP: 0
MVT: 6
FP: 2
Communications Network
Gets a +1 bonus to morale checks.
Gets 1 roll on the main weapon table (not the SS one) and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

Heavy Combat Suit
DEF: 7
HP: 3
EXP: 0
MVT: 4
FP: 2
SuperArmor
Gets +1 to DEF agains non-AP or HE weapons.
Gets 1 roll on the main weapon table (not the SS one) and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

SlaughterBot
DEF: 8
HP: 4
EXP: 0
MVT: 5
FP: 4
Regenerating Armor
If this model has less than total HP remaining, roll a d6 on the beginning of its turn. On a 6, it regains 1 HP.
Gets 2 roll on the main weapon table (not the SS one) and 1 on the grenade table. Results are applied to the whole batch.

WEAPONS

Assault Rifle
ATK: 1d6+1
ROF: 2
MULT: x1
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.

Minigun
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 5
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.
Counts as a heavy weapon.

Grenade Launcher
ATK: X
ROF: 2
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Fires Grenades
Fires grenades at the ATK and effects of the user's grenades.

Flamer
ATK: 2d6
ROF: 1
MULT: X
FP: 2
Sticky
If a target is hit by a flamer, keep rolling damage for it until the target is dead or the flamer fails to cause at least 1 HP worth of damage to the target.
Cone
Fires in a fingercone.
Weak against armor
Adds 1 to the DEF of targets with more than 5 DEF.

Autocannon
ATK: 3d6
ROF: 2
MULT: x1
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.
AP
Subtracts 1 from the DEF of its target before calculating the FTN.

Rocket Launcher
ATK: 4d6
ROF: 1/2 (every other turn)
MULT: x1
FP: 2
HE
If a target is not damaged by the explosion of a rocket launcher, it is hit again by a 2d6 ATK hit from the same point that the rocket came from.
Explosive (s)
Uses a small explosive template.
Counts as a heavy weapon.

Shotgun
ATK: 1d6+2
ROF: 1
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Fingercone
Uses a fingercone.

Sniper Rifle
ATK: 2d6
ROF: 1
MULT: x.5
FP: 2
Sniper
May target any model in any squad in LOS.
AP
Subtracts 1 from the target's DEF before calculation of the FTN.
Counts as a heavy weapon.

Ion Cannon
ATK: 3d6+2
ROF: 1
MULT: x1
FP: 2
AP
Subtracts 1 from the target's DEF before calculation of the FTN.
Counts as a heavy weapon.

Auto-Shotgun
ATK: 2d6
ROF: 2
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.
Fingercone
Uses a fingercone.

Boltgun
ATK: 1d6+2
ROF: 1
MULT: x1
FP: 2
Large Blast
Uses the large blast template.

Dual-Wielded Pistols
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 4
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.

Tesla Rifle
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 3
MULT: x3
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.
Fingercone
Uses a fingercone.

Laser Rifle
ATK: 1d6+1
ROF: 1
MULT: x1
FP: 2
Sniper
May target any model in any squad in LOS.

Pulse Rifle
ATK: 1d6+2
ROF: 1
MULT: x1
FP: 2

Laser-Guided SMG
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 2
MULT: 1.5
FP: 2
Automatic
Can split its ROF between any number of targets in the same targetted squad.
Laser Sights
Gains +1 to attack rolls against targets that are not in cover.

Fragmentation Projector
ATK: 2d6
ROF: 1
MULT: x2
FP: 2
Fingercone
Uses a fingercone.

Grenades do not take up any FP.

Frag Grenade
ATK: 1d6+2
ROF: 1
MULT: x3
AP
Subtract 1 from the DEF of the target before calculating the FTN.
Small Blast
Uses the small blast template.

HE Grenade
ATK: 2d6
ROF: 1
MULT: x4
HE
If a target is not damaged by a HE grenade, it takes a 1d6 ATK hit from the same source that the grenade came from.
Small Blast
Uses the small blast template.

Incendiary Grenade
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 1
MULT: x3
Sticky
If a target is hit by a flamer, keep rolling damage for it until the target is dead or the flamer fails to cause at least 1 HP worth of damage to the target.

4: Flash Grenade
ATK: 1d6
ROF: 1
MULT: x3
Blinding
Target hit by a flash grenade suffer no damage but instead take a -2 penalty to attacks on their next turn.
Small Blast
Uses the small blast template.
-----------------------------------------------

Hope somebody can get some use out of this.
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Postby Zahru II » Sat Aug 08, 2009 1:43 pm

Ummm... :studgod: ?
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Postby Arkbrik » Sat Aug 08, 2009 2:19 pm

This is how 40k Space Marines ought to be.
Remus: Harry... I'm a werewolf.
Harry: Are you fucking serious?
Remus: Well yes, but I don't see how that applies here.
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Postby Warhead » Sat Aug 08, 2009 3:52 pm

I like this, lots of effort here...

So why aren't you running this as a forum battle? So that then we can all get the use... and then I wont have to read it all again to work out how to use it.
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Postby birdman » Sat Aug 08, 2009 4:16 pm

Because i'm too lazy to actually get all the figs i'd need to do that in one place, and because my camera is awful.

If you want to do it, be my guest, but for now, it's just a free ruleset.
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Postby dcl32 » Mon Aug 24, 2009 12:57 pm

to much reading
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